Category Archives: tree health

Island Garden Scapes-a family business!

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Call us for all your lawn and landscape needs… thank you from Tim, Trevor, Mike, Miss Ryla, Kathleen and baby Ashlyn.

Pruning Fruit Trees

I was hired last year by a garden owner – Sharon – to prune her fruit trees.  Sharon owns a small farm near Nanaimo airport.  She had purchased the property the previous year and had inherited two fruit trees – one apple and one cherry tree.  The trees had not been trimmed for several years and were living in the shadow of a massive Douglas fir.  The trees as you will see were covered in moss and very unhealthy.  I told her I was not sure if the apple tree would recover…it was a 50/50 chance.  She really wanted to try and save it as it had produced wonderful apples the previous season.

I told her it would be a three year plan if the tree survived.  I did not want to over prune and kill the tree.  The rule for any pruning job is to never take more then 1/3 off as it can stress the tree.  I was very happy to hear the apple tree had not only survived but thrived and she had a bumper crop of apples.  I know I cannot take all of the credit as everyone had a bumper crop last year.  Mother nature always has a way to communicate a hard winter coming with the amount of fruit trees bare.  A harsh winter coming means you will have alot of fruit.   So here is year one and year two pictures.  It was very late in the season last year when she called me to prune and I was concerned about damaging the trees but I knew if they were to be saved and healthy then pruning was a must.  The cherry was already in blossom but I went ahead anyway.  I sprayed the trees with “Safer’s De-Moss” and used a soft brush to rid the trees of most of the moss.  We trimmed some of the overhanging branches off the fir tree to increase airflow and minimize the shade as much as possible to inhibit new moss growth.  The product is environmentally safe, is a potassium based soap and is safe around people and pets.

I trimmed all of the dead branches off of the trees, trimmed all suckers off and took some branches out of the middle to increase air flow and sunlight reaching the centre of the trees.

Year 1

Year Two

This year I was so very happy to see all of the new growth on both the apple and the cherry tree.  Incredibly, there is no moss growing on any of the new growth and most of moss is gone from the older limbs.  So this year, I trimmed less off, taking all of the suckers and topping the cherry tree to bring it down lower.  Sharon cannot reach the top to pick the fruit.   We also took some larger limbs off of the fir to continue to open up the fruit trees to sunshine.  It is obvious the trees are very happy now.  Here are year two pictures.   Stay tuned for year three next year.  Thank you Sharon for giving me this opportunity!

Cheer!  See you in the garden or the garden centre!

 

Winter damage tree repair

In an earlier post I showed winter damage to a tree in my back yard.  Here is the update, after carefully cutting the branch off at the base, I will leave the tree to heal.  I will not treat it unless there is a problem with it healing.  In the weeks to come, I will check on it continually to ensure that it has become diseased or infested with insects.  Although the damage is considerable to the branch, it is actually a good time for it to heal, since there are few insects around at this time of year and the thaw has not happened so the sap has not started running.  I would be much more concerned if it was later in the season and the sap was running and the insects were out as it could easily draw insects to its wound.

And although this is quite a big wound, the tree will be none the worse for wear if I have to cut the entire branch off.  The most important thing to do is to keep checking the tree as it heals.  The branch actually has two other healthy branches forking off of it, so I really would like to give the branch a chance to heal.  The other branches that were broken were much smaller so it was just a matter of cutting them off.

Winter Damage to Tree

The last week of weather on Vancouver Island has been brutal.  First snowstorms and literally inches and inches of snow accumulating with freezing temperatures and wind.  The snow here is always very very heavy when we do get snow…which is seldom.  Then we were graced with warmer temperatures and rain.  During this week of stormy weather mother nature provided us with beautiful silhouettes in nature.  With the storms comes many many trees, shrubs and plants that now have winter damage.  This beautiful tree in my yard which was stunning when the snow came, had several branches break under the weight of snow and ice.

After the storm when I realized the tree was damaged, I played a waiting game with mother nature as the branches were frozen in the snow.  Now, today, I have cut the branches off with a landscape saw, giving them a clean cut at the trunk.

I will not be using wound paint or any other kind of sealant on the tree as I know it is a myth that it requires it to heal.  Trees are incredibly resilient and will heal themselves if left alone.  Wound paints and dressings claim to prevent rot and help trees heal from pruning wounds, but research suggests that they actually do more harm than good. When you cut off a tree limb, or the bark gets damaged, the tree never actually “heals.” Instead, it compartmentalizes the wounded area with a special type of calloused wood – like a scar – that keeps out bacteria and helps the rest of the tree recover.  Wound paint can actually interfere with the trees recovery by preventing it from creating the calloused wood to compartmentalize it and can weaken the tree.  Tree wounds heal from the inside out so dressing it with wound paint can actually seal in moisture causing tree rot and allowing fungus or bacteria to survive and possibly thrive.  The last thing I want to do is interfere with the trees natural recovery processes…after all trees have been on this planet longer then humans and have evolved to heal themselves most of the time.